Domaine du Pegau Chateauneuf du Pape Reserve 2007 0,75

699,00 Inkl. moms:

Lagerstatus: Ikke på lager

95WineSpectator
95Robert Parker

Robert Parker 100P
The 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee Reservee (of which I was lucky to find a magnum on a Paris bistro’s wine list a week after my tasting at the estate) is a brilliant effort that ranks alongside the colossal 2003 Cuvee Reservee.

A blend of approximately 85% Grenache, 8-9% Syrah, and the rest Mourvedre and other varietals from 50-100+ year old vines aged in foudre, it exhibits a dense plum/purple color along with a big, sweet bouquet of beef blood, grilled herbs, barbecue smoke, lavender, sweet cassis and kirsch and a hint of Asian soy. The wine possesses a fabulous texture, a full-bodied mouthfeel and a seamless integration of tannin, acidity and alcohol.

Certainly the alcohol level is pushing 16% in this wine. With extraordinary texture and unctuosity, this remarkable effort should drink well for 20+ years yet be very appealing in its youth given the glycerin, velvety texture, and remarkable complexity.

Always one of my favorite places to visit, Laurence Feraud and her father, Paul (a speed fanatic who raced in on a motorcycle during my visit), conducted a fascinating tasting in their cellars. As value hunters know, several of the low end offerings here are wonderful expressions of Provence that deserve to be taken seriously. Under the family’s negociant label, Selection Laurence Feraud, there are some noteworthy efforts that are well worth checking out. As for the Domaine du Pegau estate wines, I had not yet tasted the 2007 Cuvee Reservee or 2007 Cuvee da Capo from bottle, and when I did, they lived up to all my previous accolades. Here are some in-the-bottle reports on recent vintages of Domaine du Pegau’s Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee Reservee, Cuvee Laurence and Cuvee da Capo. I have been buying the Cuvee Reservees since 1979 and the greatest examples include the 1981, 1983, 1985, 1989, 1990, 2003 and the 2007. Not that the other offerings are not high quality, but as Shakespeare said, “Comparisons are odious.”